First Appointment of 2019

Last night I had my very first appointment of 2019.  Horizakura spent an hour drawing and about an hour tattooing a bonji inside a cave around my right knee.  I am happy with the results and feel his idea of putting the bonji inside a cave is pretty unique.  I can’t say that I’ve ever seen it done before.  He also added water and waves at the top of my shin and the sides of my knee as well.  I returned from Japan two days ago, and I have to say the exhaustion from jet lag made this harder than it needed to be.  Overall, not too bad, but a good reminder of why a good night’s sleep before a tattoo is important!

Speaking of Japan, I did get to visit the Yokohama Tattoo Museum.  I’m not sure that I have much more to say about it that hasn’t been said in other places around the internet.  My personal favorite parts of the collection were the very old photographs of tattooed people.  I really love seeing how the techniques and motifs have stayed the same or changed through the years.  It sort of gives me a sense of connection to something larger than myself and this personal experience.  There are lots of pictures of the museum online, and I didn’t see any signs in there saying not to take pictures, so I will add a couple of my favorites here as well.  If you’re into this stuff the way I am, I highly recommend checking it out if you ever find yourself in Tokyo.  Yokohama is an easy train ride and worth the time.  Get some ramen too!

My trip was great but I am really glad to be home and back into my day to day.  Coming home to a tattoo appointment was a great way to cap the trip off.

Take a look, in a book!

 

BONUS BOWL!!!!

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Not a Book Review: World of Japanese Tattooing

I returned from a couple weeks of work travel to a very lovely surprise!  My copy of “The World of Japanese Tattooing” by Iizawa Tadasu was waiting at the office!  It took me a few months to get a copy of this book.  I suspect it would have been much easier if I was able to search for it in Japanese, but the only online option I could find was Donlon Books in London.  It cost more than I would have liked after the conversion to dollars and shipping/insurance, but I have it now and that makes me quite happy!  The book is a treasure trove of classic Japanese style.

Published by Haga Shoten in 1973, the book is composed of a large number of Japanese tattoos by such masters as Horiyoshi II, Horigoro III, Horikin and more.  It also includes an array of ukiyo-e prints and Japanese text that is (sadly) totally lost on me.  There is a brief introduction in English that gives some very interesting insight into how Japanese tattoo and its history was viewed during the time of publication.  It approaches the comparison between Japanese and Western tattoos with a pretty heavy bias, but it is a bias that no doubt existed in the late 1800s/early 1900s when cross cultural exchange of tattoo was beginning to ramp up.  Having gotten the book so recently, I haven’t had time to look through all of it with very much attention to detail, but I am very excited to do so.

All in all, that special mix of consumerism and the desire to collect has made it worth the price of admission.  I am quite proud to have added this book to my collection.  Below are a couple pictures I took:

Ukiyo-e in Rome

I haven’t had any appointments lately since Horizakura has been traveling.  However, I did have the opportunity to go to Rome for work last week.  During that trip, I happened upon a very non-Italian art exhibit.  While I doubtlessly should have been trying to get into museums to see the works of Bernini, I saw a subway advertisement that informed me of a Hiroshige exhibit nearby.  Despite the fact that the collection is typically housed in Boston (a mere 4 hours from my home), I wasn’t sure when I would next have the opportunity to see it.  It’s a great exhibit with an extensive collection of his works.  They allow photographs, so I thought I would share a few of Hiroshige’s prints that most directly relate to Japanese tattoo in their subject matter.  It’s well known that Japanese tattoo has its roots in Ukiyo-e prints, but seeing some of that influence first hand was a treat.  I have also included a humorous print that depicts a battle between Sake and Rice as well as a poem that specifically relates to the content of my tattoo.  Check it out!